Mold Basics – Part 2

Molds are tiny, multicelled organisms made up of branching filaments called hyphae (singular: hypha). Some of the hyphae are embedded in the material on which the molds grow and are called vegetative hyphae. Many molds also have other hyphae, called aerial hyphae, which absorb oxygen from the air. Rhizoids, hairlike filaments resembling roots, grow from […]

Non-Culturable Air Sampling

Overview Non-culturable spore trap samplers draw measured volumes of air through the sampling device for a specified length of time. The collection surface is a coated glass slide. Particles in the air (spores, dust, etc.) impact onto the sticky surface and are “trapped” for later analysis. A general philosophy regarding the interpretation of biological air samples […]

Culturable Air Sampling

Overview Culturable air sampling is one of the most common methods of volumetric air sampling. The sampler works by drawing measured volumes of air through an instrument that contains a petri dish (or dishes) with culture media. Spores that impact onto the plate are then allowed to incubate and grow, after which the colonies may […]

Mold Growth & Sporulation in Buildings – Part 2

    Each stage of fungal growth (spore germination, vegetative growth, sporulation) has a specific set of conditions that is optimal. Important conditions in this set are nutrient types and concentrations, light, temperature, oxygen and water availability. Water availability (i.e., water activity) is one of the most important of these. Each fungus has optimal water activities […]

Seasonal Pollen – Part 1

Each spring, summer, and fall, the season is filled with lush colors of blooming trees, grasses, and weeds, which release tiny particles. The tiny particles are known as pollen. Pollen has several vectors it uses for mobility; anemophily (movement via wind), entomophily (movement via insects), ornithophily (movement via birds), hydrophily (movement via water), chiropterophily (movement […]