Radon Contaminated Water

Radon is a gas that has no color, odor, or taste and comes from the natural radioactive breakdown of uranium in the ground. You can be exposed to radon by two main sources:

  • Radon in the air in your home (frequently called “radon in indoor air”)
  • Radon in drinking water.

Radon can get into the air your breathe and into the water you drink. Radon is also found in small amounts in outdoor air.  Most of the radon in indoor air comes from soil underneath the home. As uranium breaks down, radon gas forms and seeps into the house. Radon from soil can get into any type of building – homes, offices, and schools – and build up to high levels in the air inside the building.  Its gas can also dissolve and accumulate in water from underground sources such as wells. When water that contains radon is used in the home for showering, washing dishes, and cooking, the gas escapes from the water and goes into the air. It is similar to carbonated soda drinks where carbon dioxide is dissolved in the soda and is released when you open the bottle. Some radon also stays in the water, and is not a concern in water that comes from lakes, rivers, and reservoirs because the radon is released into the air before it ever arrives at your tap.

Breathing radon in indoor air can cause lung cancer. The gas decays into radioactive particles that can get trapped in your lungs when you breathe it. As they break down further, these particles release small bursts of energy. This can damage lung tissue and increase your chances of developing lung cancer over the course of your lifetime. People who smoke have an even greater risk. Not everyone exposed to high levels of radon will develop lung cancer. However, radon in indoor air is the second leading cause of lung cancer. About 20,000 deaths a year in the U.S. are caused by breathing radon in indoor air.

Only about 1-2 percent of radon in the air comes from drinking water. However breathing it increases the risk of lung cancer over the course of your lifetime. Some radon stays in the water; drinking water containing radon also presents a risk of developing internal organ cancers, primarily stomach cancer, however this risk is smaller than the risk of developing lung cancer from radon released to air from tap water.

Based on a National Academy of Science report, EPA estimates that radon in drinking water causes about 168 cancer deaths per year: 89% from lung cancer caused by breathing radon released to the indoor air from water and 11% from stomach cancer caused by consuming water containing radon.  If Radon is a concern for you, having it tested by a certified firm and determine whether or not you in fact have an issue.

Biowashing.com

About the author: Joe Fiorilli